Bowled Over

January 22, 2013

I  was recently put to the task of finding for a client something made of wood for the center of their Saarinen dining table. In keeping with the classic mid-century aesthetic of the home I immediately thought of a Dansk bowl or tray of some type  because of the classic modern lines that Dansk produced in wood…particulary in the 60’s and 70’s. I thought I knew exactly what I was going to find until I stumbled upon this piece…I had never seen it before. In this beautiful pale finish it would complement the pale wood veneered walls of the dining area as well as the Calacatta marble top on the table, with its pale tan and gray variegation. The softly sculpted sloping shoulder on the thick wall of the bowl created an object that was elevated far above “salad bowl” status while mimicking the shape of the George Nelson Bubble Lamp hanging above it. Even though it was designed and produced to serve up a mean Caesar, I love the way it looks empty.That was simple.Danskbowlwood2_theOverstkCopy (2) of orgcrnsmrnoFCopy of gldmnDR4F

http://www.overstock.com/Home-Garden/Dansk-Torq-White-Wood-Bowl/7300604/product.html?cid=202290&kid=9553000357392&track=pspla&adtype=pla&kw={keyword}

It’s not orange,

September 30, 2012

but it still says Fall to me. For years I have opted for a Hubbard squash as a fall season decorative object. They are large in scale so you  can easily get by with one and make a statement, and, they are interesting…really… the color, the texture, the matte finish… they  present themselves more like an elegant clay sculpture than vegetation. You can’t go wrong with them grouped with your planted containers at the front door or set in the middle of your dining room table with the addition of some fruit, like these chartreuse Gingergold apples. A beautiful way to usher in Autumn…the fact that it will also end up as dinner, well, that’s just added value.

Naturally,

August 6, 2012

I wasn’t at  my local hardware store looking for inspiration, but  indeed, inspiration struck. Who knew that a $2 ball of gardening twine could become  a handsome vase “wrap”? Softer than I had imagined, the resulting fabric presented the great color of jute linen and the simple garter stitch…a beautiful  textural contrast to a simple glass cylinder. Secured with an additional length of the jute itself ( or maybe some tan leather lacing for fall ) you have a great seasonal receptacle for a bound hand full of blown garden roses or even an assortment of grasses and foliage. I’m thinking this could be a simplequietmodern answer to your next event or holiday centerpiece. Did someone say they were getting hitched?