Hedged In

April 25, 2016

Or, so I thought. The last several winter’s extremes have taken their toll on all of my boxwood hedges. Gone. Time of death? Officially April 11, 2016. Where they once served as sharply clipped extensions of the house itself sits blank space in need of attention. So now what? Replace them as they were or start fresh with a new direction…and new plant materials that will be able to take on the bitter winters and always hungry deer. Now’s the time to jot new ideas, review old inspiration and perhaps even move into uncharted territory plant-wise. While I loved things the way they were, I can’t help thinking change might be good.

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You’ve got to love the modern use of clipped layered hedges of boxwood and yew in the masterful garden designs of Luciano Giubbilei. More of his genius can be found here: http://www.lucianogiubbilei.com/

Maybe my solution is not more boxwood at all, but horizontal fencing and drifts of native grass Bouteloua Gracilis, Blonde Ambition. Napa Landscape by Scott Lewis Photo: via Gardenista

After a black and white Winter perhaps yellow Magnolia tucked into the woods would be a welcome sight come Spring, like this Magnolia Yellow Bird. Photo: gp

 

 

 

 

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It seems early this year…the Memorial Day weekend. Particularly when I have yet to knock a dent in my Spring punch list of gardening projects. Really, it’s a “to-do” list as I have no changes planned, only a review to see who had the strength to survive, who lost the fight and a little annual manicure and mulch. Hopefully the extra day will help me put things in good order as we unofficially kick off Summer.

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Before anything else, honor the fallen by displaying the flag.

It looks like  that boxwood hedge could use a crisp edge.

This gift of water hyacinth will grace my interior until they take up Summer residence outdoors.

The varied colors and textures of the Blue Dune Grass, Lysimachia ” Goldilocks” and large lobed non- blooming Lambsear compliment the Pines and Birch on site perfectly.   Photos: gp

I’d like to add this black Mondo Grass to some large modern concrete saucers at the entry, but the jury is still out on whether or not they can really handle the harsh zone 5 winters. Photo: Better Homes and Gardens

 

 

 

Mid-Summer at…

July 31, 2014

Gray Gardens. If you would have followed my lead you would be relaxing in a modern garden space that is surprisingly cooling in the heat of Mid-Summer. Anchored by the soft crunch of weed discouraging pea gravel or bluestone paving, the simplequietmodern plant selections play their shades and textures against the tight architectural placement to optimum effect. Not missing those geraniums now, are ya?

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top to bottom: photo 1 & 2, Foras Studio via Gardenista…photo 3, GP…last photo, Deborah Nevins via Gardenista