Putting the plan to paper,

August 20, 2016

starts with a little inspiration. This garden by Australian designer Peter Fudge totally embraces the simplequietmodern aesthetic. A beautiful composition of clipped hedges and hardscaping against the softened edges of natural treeline and massed plantings of native grasses. Dappled sunlight and gentle sounds of moving water. The perfect place to spend a late summer day. I’d start here in the morning with coffee, break here midday with lunch, nap here in the afternoon and finish here with dinner or cocktails. Close your eyes and take a deep breath. Are you there yet?

PetrFudgL8P9715

PetrFudgL8P9576

Photos:  http://peterfudgegardens.com.au/      

 

Advertisements

Mid-Summer at…

July 31, 2014

Gray Gardens. If you would have followed my lead you would be relaxing in a modern garden space that is surprisingly cooling in the heat of Mid-Summer. Anchored by the soft crunch of weed discouraging pea gravel or bluestone paving, the simplequietmodern plant selections play their shades and textures against the tight architectural placement to optimum effect. Not missing those geraniums now, are ya?

foras boerum 2

700_bluestone-backyard-foras-studio-brooklyn_grdnsta_crpt

gpsecgardn7_07crpt

Deborah_Nevins_Laird_2_grdnsta

top to bottom: photo 1 & 2, Foras Studio via Gardenista…photo 3, GP…last photo, Deborah Nevins via Gardenista

 

Any volunteers?

June 17, 2013

Really, look around…do a quick survey of your site…and make a few notes as to the indigenous plant material that has made a home there on its own…the volunteers. If they are doing well, you have the added benefit of knowing that in addition to being happy they’ll be safe from attacks by local fauna. This is a great  jumping off point when selecting the plant material for your new landscaping project. The  juxtaposition of modern meadow against structures, clipped yew, tallhedge or boxwood  may be just the simplequietmodern statement you’ve been looking for. Dutch landscape master Piet Oudolf  illustrates this point to perfection in the design of the Highline in Manhattan as well as both public and private spaces around the world. If inspiration like this can come from a quick inventory of flora in an abandoned elevated train track I imagine you could pull a little magic from the “surprises” popping up in your yard. 208HighlineNYpOudolf_highlineNYpOudolfSONY DSC228_meadowmxpOudolfFhttp://www.oudolf.com/piet-oudolftumblr_modzpdr4zK1qd5e3ao2_500,hedghttp://remash.tumblr.com/hsfrnt3cropgpyard7_07crpcropgpyard7_07b