Let’s Review

January 3, 2018

Another year has passed, and with it, another year of  simplequietmodern. As I prepare for year seven, I’m  excited to see what held your interest over the last twelve months. The MidCentury seating of Van Keppel Green, modern black fences, the “folded” plywood works of Harry Roseman, factory inspired windows and a cozy white Christmas topped the list. Thank you for your continued interest, for stopping and sharing your kind words, for your friendship…for indulging me.

 

 

We can’t celebrate without cake, can we? I’m thinking a Burnt Almond Torte from Prantl’s Bakery in Pittsburgh might be in order. And of course, some flowers.

 

Top to bottom: links to each of your favorite posts:

https://simplequietmodern.com/2014/08/03/case-study-van-keppel-green/

https://simplequietmodern.com/2014/03/31/black-fences/

https://simplequietmodern.com/2014/02/19/a-single-sheet/

https://simplequietmodern.com/2016/03/10/let-the-sun-shine-let-the-sun-shine-in/

https://simplequietmodern.com/2017/12/24/white-christmas/

torte photo: https://www.goldbely.com/prantls-bakery/15395-burnt-almond-torte

 

 

 

 

 

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Out of the Dark

December 20, 2017

And, slowly moving into the light. The Winter Solstice on December 21 marks the shortest day of the year in terms of daylight and the official start of Winter. A depressing thought to be sure until the realization hits that from this point forward we gain a bit of extra daylight each day until Spring. While the ancients celebrated by decking the halls in evergreens and building roaring fires, us moderns might go for a little candlelight and white flowers, a simple reminder of the Spring to come. White tulips of any variety are my favorites on this, my most favorite day of the year, but anything white will do. Forced Paperwhite bulbs or bracts of cut white Poinsettias displayed in simple glass vases will be welcome additions that will last right through Christmas.

 

 

Paperwhite and Ponsettia photos via https://www.gardenista.com/posts/poinsettias-rethinking-traditional-christmas-flower/

Top three photos: gp

Winter Garden

January 17, 2016

There is no better time than now to rethink the Winter garden. Keep the plan simple…implement it in the Spring…let it take root through the Summer and wait for the rewards come Fall and Winter. You might be inspired by the gardens of Dutch designer Piet Oudolf, with great drifts of native perennials and grasses, their varied color,texture and structure framed by clipped hedge rows or a distant borrowed vista. Maybe a simpler plan is more to your taste with the selection of a few species planted together in a sort of modern meadow. Simpler still, the work of San Franciscan landscape architect Scott Lewis might lead you to bold stokes of a single variety, neatly framed and punctuated with a mature specimen. The best part of this exercise is your reduced carbon footprint, time freed up this summer to spend doing anything but weeding and deadheading and a simplequietmodern new view through every window from October to the following March.

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http://www.gardenista.com/posts/10-garden-ideas-to-steal-from-superstar-dutch-designer-piet-oudolf

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http://www.gardenista.com/posts/vineyard-haven-a-napa-valley-garden-that-belongs-to-the-land-scott-lewis-landscape-architect-visit

 

 

Mid-Summer at…

July 31, 2014

Gray Gardens. If you would have followed my lead you would be relaxing in a modern garden space that is surprisingly cooling in the heat of Mid-Summer. Anchored by the soft crunch of weed discouraging pea gravel or bluestone paving, the simplequietmodern plant selections play their shades and textures against the tight architectural placement to optimum effect. Not missing those geraniums now, are ya?

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top to bottom: photo 1 & 2, Foras Studio via Gardenista…photo 3, GP…last photo, Deborah Nevins via Gardenista

 

Bridging The Gap

May 11, 2014

Gabions. Wire cages filled with rock, bridging the gap between rustic and modern, old and new, hard and soft. A landscape application that  I’m surprised I don’t see more of. Retaining walls, fences or even enclosures can be achieved cost effectively using steel wire gabion baskets with rock or stone…even recycled concrete. While it might look like a DIY project, seeking out a landscape professional could save some time and expense.

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photo via Pinterest

bchrock

photo:gp

kettelkamp-landscape-michigan-sumhouse-6-gardenistaCrpt

http://www.gardenista.com/posts/landscape-architect-visit-a-classic-lake-michigan-summer-house-by-kettelkamp-kettelkamp

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photo via http://remash.tumblr.com/

 

Black Fences

March 31, 2014

If  “good fences make good neighbors” * what would Robert Frost have written about black fences?  Chic neighbors? There is no denying the sophisticated good looks of these black fences or how they elevate the green elements around them to a new level entirely. Picture them running down a property with their long horzontal lines… can you see the forced perspective? Even the simple picket has more appeal when given a modern facelift of a beefier profile and black finish. With an injection of a little drama like this you might even be able to skip using color at all in your garden this year. Just a thought.

black-fence-roundup-allworth-design_gardenista

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photos via http://www.gardenista.com/posts/trend-alert-black-fences

* “Mending Wall” by Robert Frost